Daily Edge for Mon. Jan. 29

UP & DOWN AGAIN.  The rollercoaster of winter continues as we warm to near 40 tomorrow night, and drop off hard at the end of the work week.  In the meantime, we talk about the system driving that pattern, shed antlers and what used to dominate the plains of North Dakota in today’s Three Things.

(Featured Photo: A young buck with antlers still attached in early January. Simonson Photo)

DAILY CONDITIONS:

WEATHER (Bismarck Forecast):
Today:  Mon 1/29 – Climbing Out. Hi 18, Lo 1. Winds L&V
Tomorrow:  Tue 1/30 – One-Day Warmup. Hi 41, Lo 18, Winds S@10 to NW@15

SOLUNAR (Bismarck Times)
:
Sunrise: 8:09AM Sunset: 5:43PM
Moonrise: 3:38PM Moonset 6:25AM
Overhead: 11:38PM Underfoot: 11:06AM
Moon Phase: Waxing Gibbous (95% Full)

EDGE HOUR:  9:30 – 10:30AM. Moon underfoot will extend early morning success into today’s Edge Hour.

DAY RATING:
3Fish

THREE THINGS.

HANGING ON.  Bucks can retain their antlers deep into winter, but most are shed by this time in the season, especially by those big, rut-worn bucks.  Look for most antlers to have hit the ground by now,  and get ready for a late winter and spring full of shed hunting, especially with current light snow cover.  The activity not only provides for some neat souvenirs and a way to track deer movement, but also a sign (or two) that the resident big buck made it through the end of gun season.

LOW UP NORTH.  We’ll be at the whim of a big low pressure system moving its way over Canada, as a warm bubble gets pulled up on the front end and cold conditions return on the back end.  Watch the ARL GFS model and get ready to ride the ridge as things warm up into Tuesday night and fall back down to near zero by Thursday.

ND DINO DIGS.  This New York Times article details what once roamed the plains of North Dakota.  From rhinos to dinosaurs, fossils of all sorts are dug up by visiting people and professional paleontologists from Pembina to Dickinson.  It was a much warmer place this time of year about 60 million years ago, and the flora and fauna buried in the state’s sedimentary rocks are proof of that.

Stay Sharp!

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